Posts tagged Design

Successful PCB Grounding With Mixed-Signal Chips – Part 3

In Part 1: Principles of Current Flow, we began with the basics. We learned that high-frequency signals flow not in the path of least resistance, but in the path of least impedance. We also discussed some fundamental principles of current flow in PCBs with ground planes.

In Part 2: Design to Minimize Signal-Path Crosstalk, we applied those principles to real-world circuits and to the PCB layout of these circuits. We learned how to place components and route signal traces to minimize problems with crosstalk.

In this final Part 3 we consider the power source currents and how to apply what we have learned to circuits with multiple mixed-signal ICs. We finish with an example where a ground plane cut is useful.

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Startup Samples 60 GHz Transceiver

SAN JOSE, Calif. – Startup Peraso Technologies Inc. (Toronto) is sampling a 60 GHz transceiver suitable for the 802.11ad and WiGig standards. The PRS1021 can deliver up to 3.52 Gbits/second over unlicensed 57 to 66 GHz bands.

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Successful PCB Grounding With Mixed-Signal Chips – Part 2

When we began this series, we observed that board-level designers often have concerns about the proper way to handle grounding for integrated circuits that have separate analog and digital grounds.

Part 1 focused on the basics: where the current flows. We learned that high-frequency signals flow not in the path of least resistance, but in the path of least impedance. We also discussed some fundamental principles of current flow in PCBs with ground planes.

In Part 2 we are now ready to apply these principles to the PCB layout of real-world circuits. We will learn how to place components and route signal traces to minimize problems with crosstalk.

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Successful PCB Grounding With Mixed-Signal Chips – Part 1

Board-level designers often have concerns about the proper way to handle grounding for integrated circuits (ICs) which have separate analog and digital grounds. Should the two be completely separate and never touch? Should they connect at a single point with cuts in the ground plane to enforce this single point or “Mecca” ground? How can a Mecca ground be implemented when there are several ICs that call for analog and digital grounds?

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