Posts tagged ARRL

TX7M Confirmed!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are only 8 days left to try and log TX7M from Marquesas. Somehow I managed to miss this crew that has been operating from the island since October 19th. Between T32C wrapping up their DXpedition this Wednesday and ZK2X just starting their operation from Niue I’m seriously gonna have to try and put up the dipole someplace and work them on as many freqs as possible. *sigh* If only I had digital capabilities.

ISS To Be On The Air For JOTA

If you are planning on participating in this weekend’s Jamboree On the Air (JOTA), take note: Astronaut Mike Fossum, KF5AQG, is planning to participate in JOTA from the International Space Station, using the call sign NA1SS.

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The K7RA Solar Update

Sunspot excitement continues, as we continue to see daily images of our Sun peppered with spots. The average daily sunspot numbers for the week were about the same as the previous week, increasing from 96.1 to 96.7, while the average daily solar flux dropped from 155.5 to 132.6.

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Every Radio Amateur Knows That Spectrum Defense Matters

The second edition for 2011 of Spectrum Defense Matters — a newsletter aimed at keeping ARRL members updated on issues related to the protection of Amateur Radio frequencies — was recently released on the ARRL website.

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ARRL In Action: What Have We Been Up To Lately?

Compiled by S. Khrystyne Keane, K1SFA
ARRL News Editor
k1sfa@arrl.org

This feature — including convenient Web links to useful information — is a concise monthly update of some of the things ARRL is doing on behalf of its members. This installment covers the month of September.

The ARRL briefed members of the White House staff on Amateur Radio’s capabilities during emergencies.

Radio amateurs around the country are gearing up for the annual Simulated Emergency Test.

The ARRL is seeking a new Treasurer. After more than 31 years of distinguished service to the ARRL as its volunteer Treasurer, Jim McCobb, K1LU, has announced his retirement.

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Attention Techs: 10 Meters Is Hot!

With solar flux numbers not seen since 2004, the higher HF bands have seen a surge in activity. The solar flux has been at least 100 since August 20. On September 10, it reached 116, rising to 121 the next day.

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Hurricane Irene Frequencies

1905 LSB Delaware Voice Tertiary
3582 LSB New Hampshire NBEMS Primary
3583.5 LSB W. Pennsylvania Digital Primary
3815 LSB Hurricane Watch Net WX4NHC is the National Hurricane Center
3820 LSB Maryland | DC Voice Primary
3905 LSB Delaware Voice Primary
3923 LSB North Carolina Voice Primary
3940 LSB

LSB

Maine

South Florida

Voice Primary

Voice Primary

3943 LSB Massachusetts Voice Primary
3945 LSB New Hampshire Voice Primary
3947 LSB Virginia Voice Primary
3950 LSB North Florida Voice Primary
3965 LSB Connecticut Voice Primary
3976 LSB Vermont Voice Primary
3978 LSB New Jersey Voice Primary
3983 LSB W. Pennsylvania Voice Primary
3987.5 LSB

LSB

E. Pennsylvania

W. Pennsylvania

Voice Primary

Voice Primary

4372 USB U.S. Navy FACSFAC Hampton Roads Ship Evacuation Sortie
5211 LSB | USB FEMA
6577 USB New York Radio Hurricane Hunters w/ ATC
7073 LSB W. Pennsylvania Digital Secondary
7227.5 LSB W. Pennsylvania Voice Secondary
7232 LSB North Carolina Voice Secondary
7240 LSB Virginia Voice Secondary
7262 LSB Maine Voice Secondary
7268 LSB Hurricane Watch Net WX4NHC is the National Hurricane Center
7272 LSB W. Pennsylvania Voice Secondary
7275 LSB Vermont Voice Secondary
7300 LSB Delaware Voice Secondary
10493 LSB | USB FEMA
13956 LSB | USB FEMA
14265 USB SATERN Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network
14300 USB MMSN Maritime Mobile Service Net
14325 USB Hurricane Watch Net WX4NHC is the National Hurricane Center
14396.5 USB SHARES HF Primary

The K7RA Solar Update

(ARRL) The average daily sunspot numbers this week were up 57 percent over the previous seven days, rising from 41.6 to 65.6, while the average daily solar flux rose just 3 points to 89.1. There seem to be plenty of sunspots of late, but none have been large, and so the sunspot number and solar flux are not as high as in some previous months. A new sunspot appeared on July 7, then three more the next day on July 8, and then a new one each day on July 9, 10 and 11, and two more on July 13, with another two on July 14. A coronal mass ejection on July 9 gave us some geomagnetic activity a couple of days later. Sunspot numbers for July 7-13 were 42, 65, 55, 67, 72, 62 and 96, with a mean of 65.6. The 10.7 cm flux was 85.5, 85.8, 85.6, 90.7, 90.1, 91.7 and 94.6, with a mean of 89.1. The estimated planetary A indices were 6, 8, 12, 12, 13, 8 and 8, with a mean of 9.6. The estimated mid-latitude A indices were 6, 6, 10, 8, 10, 7 and 6, with a mean of 7.6.

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